Posts Tagged ‘Real Estate’


5 Easy Steps to File Your 1099’s….Guaranteed

It’s time for business owners to file their 1099’s.

Here are 5 Easy Steps to do this:

1) Determine who you will be Required to File a 1099 For

Form 1099 is due to any independent contractor who is unincorporated and you pay $600 or more to in a year.  Additionally all payments for legal services must be issued a 1099 regardless of whether the provider is incorporated or not. An unincorporated business includes sole proprietorships, general partnerships and limited … Continue reading »


When (and How) to Declare the Sale of Your Primary Residence

Recently a new client came to us.  The Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) was looking for $262,532 in back taxes.  This was from the sale of their home two years ago.

Form 1099-S Reporting Requirements

Attorneys that handle real estate closings must report the proceeds on IRS Form 1099-S, Sale of Real Estate Property.  There is an exception to this however. If the seller of the real estate signs a certification, the attorney does not need to issue the 1099.  … Continue reading »


3 Reasons to Recognize Capital Gains in 2012

1) The Long-Term Capital Gains Rate is Going Up

Long-term capital gains are for capital assets held longer than a year. Capital assets include stocks, bonds and mutual funds. Collectibles and certain Real Estate are subject to special rules.  The stated rate on long-term capital gains is currently 15%.  If Congress fails to take any action, this will increase to 20%.  The so-called Bush tax cuts reduced the rate on long-term capital gains to 15%.  These tax … Continue reading »


Rental Property Owners Get Relief from 1099 Reporting Requirements

Originally under the Small Business Jobs Act, those who received rental income from real estate were going to be considered, to be engaged in a business, and were going to be subject to the requirements to issue 1099 information returns.  This act was going to make owners of rental properties report payments totaling $600 or more during the course of the year for any expenses relating to these properties. The provision required even the smallest property owners — those who … Continue reading »


The 5 Most Common Itemized Deductions

Mortgage Interest—Many taxpayers can deduct their mortgage interest on their residence.  However, there is a limitation on this.  The interest on a primary residence can only be deducted on up to $1,000,000 mortgage and $100,000 line of credit.  Points paid to secure a mortgage when purchasing a new home are fully deductible.  Points paid on a refinance must be amortized over the life of the loan.