Posts Tagged ‘Form W-2’


4 Reasons All Employers Should Offer a Roth 401(k) Plan

 

1) The Roth 401(k) Plan Has a Higher Contribution Limit that a Roth IRA

Taxpayers can contribute up to $5,000 per year into a Roth IRA. Taxpayers over age 50 can contribute an additional ‘catch-up’ contribution of $1,000 for a total of $6,000.  To contribute to a Roth IRA you need to have earned income at least up to the amount of the contribution. Earned income is from wages as an employee (Form W-2) or … Continue reading »


Why The New Medicare Tax May Cost You More Money

Current Medicare Tax

Currently taxpayers pay 1.45% Medicare Tax on their earned income. This is from a W-2 for employees and net-income from self-employed individuals. The employee pays this amount and the employer matches it, therefore they remit 2.9% to the government. A self-employed individual is considered to be both the employer and employee and therefore currently pays 2.9% Medicare Tax.


The Difference Between a C Corporation and a Subchapter S Corporation

Business owners can maintain their corporation as a regular or “C” Corporation. Alternatively, if they are eligible, they may want to make a Subchapter S Election. Both are treated as separate legal entities. Here are the differences however:

C Corporation

While a C Corporation is a separate legal entity, it is also a separate taxable entity. The corporation will pay income taxes on any taxable income reported.


Ten Tips to Help You Choose a Tax Preparer

The IRS has published 10 tips to help you choose a paid tax preparer to file your return this year. Even if a return is prepared by someone else, the taxpayer is legally responsible for what’s on it. So, it’s very important to choose your tax preparer carefully. Here are the IRS’s top ten tips to keep in mind when choosing a tax return preparer:

 

 

1. … Continue reading »


The Difference Between an LLC and a Subchapter S Corporation

Startup businesses are often considering either a Limited Liability Company ("LLC") or a Subchapter S Corporation.  Here are the differences: