Posts Tagged ‘Medicare Tax’


3 Proven Reasons a Connecticut Business Owner Should Elect Subchapter S

Gesture - Three Fingers (with clipping path)

 

 

Business owners of corporations will by default have a “C” Corporation.  If they are eligible and they elect, they could be a Subchapter S (“Sub S”) corporation.

 

 

 

An eligible Sub S corporation meets the following criteria:


A Summary of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012

 

The Federal Government avoided the Fiscal Cliff...Well, for now any way.

 

At the very last minute they passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012.  Here are some of the highlights:

 

 Income, Capital Gains and Qualifying Dividends Tax


3 Reasons You Likely Won’t Pay Income Taxes When You Sell Your Home

1) You Don’t Have a Capital Gain

 

Due to the housing market, many homeowners no longer have a gain in their home. A gain is the sales price minus the cost basis. The cost basis is generally the purchase price of the property plus improvements. Improvements would include things like a new roof, new heating system or a deck being added to the home. Unfortunately many people have seen any potential capital gain disappear in recent years due to … Continue reading »


3 Reasons to Recognize Capital Gains in 2012

1) The Long-Term Capital Gains Rate is Going Up

Long-term capital gains are for capital assets held longer than a year. Capital assets include stocks, bonds and mutual funds. Collectibles and certain Real Estate are subject to special rules.  The stated rate on long-term capital gains is currently 15%.  If Congress fails to take any action, this will increase to 20%.  The so-called Bush tax cuts reduced the rate on long-term capital gains to 15%.  These tax … Continue reading »


Why The New Medicare Tax May Cost You More Money

Current Medicare Tax

Currently taxpayers pay 1.45% Medicare Tax on their earned income. This is from a W-2 for employees and net-income from self-employed individuals. The employee pays this amount and the employer matches it, therefore they remit 2.9% to the government. A self-employed individual is considered to be both the employer and employee and therefore currently pays 2.9% Medicare Tax.


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