Posts Tagged ‘Married Filing Jointly’


7 Things Connecticut Taxpayers Should Do Before Filing Their Income Tax Return

1) Don’t panic. The returns are due on April 17th this year. This is due to April 15th falling on the weekend and April 16th being a holiday in Washington DC. If you can’t get your return completed and filed on time, file an extension. The federal form is 4868 and the Connecticut form is CT-1040-EXT. This will allow you until October 15th to file. The extension however only extends the time to file, it does not extend the … Continue reading »


3 Reasons To File IRS Form 8938, Statement of Specified Foreign Assets

1) You have a “Specified Foreign Financial Asset” which exceeds the filing requirements

Financial Assets that are subject to this form are: A Financial Account maintained by a foreign institution and the following assets not held in an account with a foreign institution:

* Stock or security issued by a foreign person

* Financial instrument where the issuer is not a U.S. Person

* And any interest in a foreign entity


The Difference Between Short-Term and Long-Term Capital Gains

The sale of a capital asset will result in a capital gain.  Depending on the holding period of this asset, the gain will either be short-term or long-term. Long-term gains have a lower, preferred income tax rate.  The holding period begins on the day the asset is purchased, as measured by the trade date, to the day the asset is sold. Assets that are inherited are deemed to be held long term.


The 5 Most Common Itemized Deductions

Mortgage Interest—Many taxpayers can deduct their mortgage interest on their residence.  However, there is a limitation on this.  The interest on a primary residence can only be deducted on up to $1,000,000 mortgage and $100,000 line of credit.  Points paid to secure a mortgage when purchasing a new home are fully deductible.  Points paid on a refinance must be amortized over the life of the loan.


Important Connecticut Witholding Tax Information for Employers

Recently enacted legislation makes significant changes to Section 12-700(a) of the General Statutes retroactive to January 1, 2011. Employers and taxpayers need to perform catch-up withholding for the current tax year.  The following is a brief overview of the changes which may affect your employees: