Posts Tagged ‘Gift’


How to Calculate Your Cost Basis and Save Money…Guaranteed

money

When you sell a capital asset you need to know when you purchased it and what the cost basis is.  These will be used to determine what your capital gain (or loss) is.  Capital assets are items such as stocks, bonds and mutual funds.

Holding Period

A short-term capital gain is for a capital asset held a year or … Continue reading »


3 Reasons Many Family Loans Turn into Grants

Have you made a loan to a child or grandchild?

When making a loan, you have an expectation of getting paid back.  When a family loan turns into a grant, you’re not going to get paid back. Here are 3 reasons a family loan may turn into a grant.


3 Easy Ways to Financially Help Your Children or Grandchildren

Do your children or grandchildren need some financial assistance?

Here are 3 Easy Ways to help them:

 

1) Make a Loan

Parents and grandparents can loan to their child or grandchild.  If this is the approach taken, a formal loan agreement should be drawn up.  This should include interest and the repayment terms.  The Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) will require a minimum amount of interest to be charged.  This is known as the Applicable Federal Rate (“AFR”).  This … Continue reading »


How to Maximize Your Annual Gifts and Minimize Your Estate Taxes

Annual Exclusion

Taxpayers are allowed to gift up to $13,000 per year to an unlimited number of people without having to file a gift tax return or pay a gift tax. If the amount goes over $13,000 to any one individual, then a gift tax return must be filed. This is done on IRS Form 709, United States Gift Tax Return. Connecticut taxpayers required to file a federal gift tax return would be required to file Form CT-706/709. The … Continue reading »


7 Smart Year End Tax Planning Moves

 

1) Harvest Capital Losses

Capital gains property includes stocks, bonds and mutual funds.  Currently, the stated rate on long term capital gains is 15%.  If you have a net loss after netting all of your gains and losses, the tax deduction is limited to $3,000. Any excess capital losses can be carried into the future.


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